ADHD Nation: Children, Doctors, Big Pharma, and the Making of an American Epidemic

ADHD Nation: Children, Doctors, Big Pharma, and the Making of an American Epidemic

Alan Schwarz

3.29.2017

Alan Schwarz

Alan Schwarz is a Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist best known for his reportage of public health issues for The New York Times. His 130-article series on concussions in sports is roundly credited with revolutionizing the treatment of head injuries in professional and youth sports, and was a finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. He followed that with a series on A.D.H.D. and other psychiatric disorders in children, which led to his writing A.D.H.D. NATION.

Mr. Schwarz is regarded as an expert on the use of mathematics and probability in journalism – his statistical analyses of data regarding both concussions and children’s mental health formed the backbone of both series. He has lectured at dozens of universities and professional conferences about these subjects, including keynotes at the 2015 SAS annual convention and this June at the Andrew Wiles Mathematical Institute at the University of Oxford.

Mr. Schwarz was honored by the American Statistical Association in 2013 with its Lifetime Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award. He holds a bachelor of arts degree in Mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania.

A native of Scarsdale, N.Y., Mr. Schwarz, 48, lives with his family in Manhattan.

ADHD Nation is the definitive account of the widespread misdiagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder—and how its unchecked growth over half a century has made ADHD one of the most controversial conditions in medicine, with serious effects on children, adults, and society. In ADHD Nation, Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist Alan Schwarz examines the roots and the rise of this cultural and medical phenomenon: The father of ADHD, Dr. Keith Conners, spends fifty years advocating drugs like Ritalin before realizing his role in what he now calls “a national disaster of dangerous proportions”; a troubled young girl and a studious teenage boy get entangled in the growing ADHD machine and take medications that backfire horribly; and big Pharma egregiously over-promotes the disorder and earns billions from the mishandling of children and adults. While demonstrating that ADHD is real and can be medicated when appropriate, Schwarz sounds an alarm and urges America to address this growing national health crisis.