"Latino Leadership and the Cinco de Mayo in the American West"

"Latino Leadership and the Cinco de Mayo in the American West"

David E. Hayes-Bautista

3.16.2017

David E. Hayes-Bautista

David E. Hayes-Bautista is currently distinguished professor of medicine and director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He graduated from U.C. Berkeley, and completed his doctoral work in Basic Sciences at the University of California Medical Center, San Francisco. He served on the faculty at the School of Public Health at U.C. Berkeley until 1987, when he took his current position at UCLA. His research on the Latino Epidemiological Paradox led him to analyze linkages between culture, behavior, and health outcomes. This program is in partnership with UAMS Center for Diversity Affairs, UAMS Translational Research Institute, UAMS College of Pharmacy, Arkansas Center for Health Disparities League, League of United Latin American Citizens, and UALR Joel E. Anderson Institute on Race and Ethnicity.

While millions of people across the USA celebrate the Cinco de Mayo, very few know that this was begun by Latinos in California, Nevada, and Oregon as part of the Latino experience of the American Civil War in the Far West. This presentation will explain why the Cinco de Mayo is so widely celebrated in the US, and why it is not so celebrated in Mexico. David E. Hayes-Bautista is currently distinguished professor of medicine and director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He graduated from U.C. Berkeley, and completed his doctoral work in Basic Sciences at the University of California Medical Center, San Francisco. He served on the faculty at the School of Public Health at U.C. Berkeley until 1987, when he took his current position at UCLA. His research on the Latino Epidemiological Paradox led him to analyze linkages between culture, behavior, and health outcomes. This program is in partnership with UAMS Center for Diversity Affairs, UAMS Translational Research Institute, UAMS College of Pharmacy, Arkansas Center for Health Disparities League, League of United Latin American Citizens, and UALR Joel E. Anderson Institute on Race and Ethnicity.