The Religious Case Against Belief

The Religious Case Against Belief

James Carse

4.16.2009

James Carse

James Carse directed the Religious Studies Program at New York University for thirty years as Professor of the History and Literature of Religion. He received a Bachelor’s from Ohio Wesleyan, a Master’s from Yale, and his PhD from Drew University. He has been selected as a member of a number of professional societies and has received of a number of teaching awards. In total, Professor Carse has written eight books, most recently “The Religious Case Against Belief,” and he is a frequent lecturer at colleges and universities.

As part of the Arkansas Literary Festival, religious scholar James Carse discusses his book, "The Religious Case Against Belief," which depicts a world where religion and belief have become erroneously conflated. From the Crusades to the contemporary Christian right, from the Inquisition to Islamic jihadists, Carse argues that belief — with its restriction on thought and encouragement of hostility — has corrupted religion and spawned violence around the world.